is a post I found most intriguing. Computational Biology and Bioinformatics programs are very competitive to get into as this field is in demand and and also the competition is fierce: you are competing against bio, comp sci, and math students for the spots in these programs. The University of Pittsburgh’s Department of Physics and Astronomy is recognized nationally and internationally for faculty at the frontier of research who mentor graduate students on an individual level. If you're smart enough (you don't have to be a genius), Caltech is actually the easiest top school to get into, simply because its admissions process is more straightforward (in terms of what it expects out of students) than others.

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Anyways, this does get into subjective territory. I'd really appreciate it. Some of us are smart and lazy (well, lazy if we had to do the work in other departments, which often contain more busywork+memorization+class participation), and we might actually find physics programs to be MUCH easier to get into. [quote] Wow. Examine the statistics. Go through the Physics GRE site. While top math PhD programs enrollment are roughly 20/r, … Sort by: Acceptance Rate. That was the only one with the combo I could find so far.

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EDIT: looked for more, almost no more examples. This document describes the doctoral program in the Physics Department. The difficulty of admission in a graduate program is driven by funding as much as it is driven by competition. For example, in 2016 University of Michigan’s math doctoral program had a 17.2 percent acceptance rate, whereas its master’s program had a much higher 31.8 percent rate.

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It's true that humanities programs are more competitive (percentage-wise) than science, as the post you links points out. Sure, lots of people complain about the PGRE, but it's incredible how little they study for it. Just on this site.

mit physics phd acceptance rate

Sort by: Acceptance Rate.

Maybe they have amazing physics research but didn't do well on the Physics GRE? Good point about students needing to demonstrate enormous capability too. No, we only offer a Ph.D. How do I apply? American Institute of Physics, Contact us

Thus they can only support a few, top students.

. is a post I found most intriguing. Computational Biology and Bioinformatics programs are very competitive to get into as this field is in demand and and also the competition is fierce: you are competing against bio, comp sci, and math students for the spots in these programs. The University of Pittsburgh’s Department of Physics and Astronomy is recognized nationally and internationally for faculty at the frontier of research who mentor graduate students on an individual level. If you're smart enough (you don't have to be a genius), Caltech is actually the easiest top school to get into, simply because its admissions process is more straightforward (in terms of what it expects out of students) than others.

,

Anyways, this does get into subjective territory. I'd really appreciate it. Some of us are smart and lazy (well, lazy if we had to do the work in other departments, which often contain more busywork+memorization+class participation), and we might actually find physics programs to be MUCH easier to get into. [quote] Wow. Examine the statistics. Go through the Physics GRE site. While top math PhD programs enrollment are roughly 20/r, … Sort by: Acceptance Rate. That was the only one with the combo I could find so far.

,

EDIT: looked for more, almost no more examples. This document describes the doctoral program in the Physics Department. The difficulty of admission in a graduate program is driven by funding as much as it is driven by competition. For example, in 2016 University of Michigan’s math doctoral program had a 17.2 percent acceptance rate, whereas its master’s program had a much higher 31.8 percent rate.

,

It's true that humanities programs are more competitive (percentage-wise) than science, as the post you links points out. Sure, lots of people complain about the PGRE, but it's incredible how little they study for it. Just on this site.

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